Author Topic: Warforged Feats as Background Options (Eberron)  (Read 121 times)

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Offline EltonJ

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Warforged Feats as Background Options (Eberron)
« on: August 04, 2022, 03:58:09 PM »
Here are the Warforged Feats from the Eberron Campaign Setting.

MITHRIL BODY [WARFORGED]
A warforged character’s body can be crafted with a layer of mithril that provides some protection without hindering speed or gracefulness.
Prerequisites: Warforged, 1st level only.
Benefit: Your armor bonus is increased to +5, and you are considered to be wearing light armor. You now have a +5 maximum Dexterity bonus to AC, a –2 penalty on all skill checks that armor check penalties apply to (Balance, Climb, Escape Artist, Hide, Jump, Move Silently, Sleight of Hand, Swim, and Tumble), and an arcane spell failure chance of 15%.
Normal: Without this feat, your warforged character has an armor bonus of +2.
Special: Unlike most feats, this feat must be taken at 1st level, during character creation. Warforged druids who take this feat cannot cast druid spells or use any of their druid supernatural or spell-like class abilities. Warforged characters with this feat do not gain the benefi t of any class feature prohibited to a character wearing light armor.

MITHRIL FLUIDITY [WARFORGED]
Your movements are smoother and more fluid than those of other warforged.
Prerequisites: Warforged, Mithral Body.
Benefits: The maximum Dexterity bonus a warforged with the Mithral Body feat can apply to Armor Class is increased by 1. In addition, the armor check penalties to Balance, Climb, Escape Artist, Hide, Jump, Move Silently, Sleight of Hand, and Tumble checks are reduced by 1.
Special: This feat can be taken multiple times. However, armor check penalties cannot be reduced to less than +0.

There's more feats from Races of Eberron that can be turned into background options (Although some feats need to be converted to Rolemaster equivalent special materials.  Like Adamantine Body can be converted to Eog body).  I'll list those later.  I was thinking of getting out Character Law and assigning points to these.  Do you think these would be overpowered?

Offline jdale

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Re: Warforged Feats as Background Options (Eberron)
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2022, 04:43:02 PM »
It's interesting that the first one comes with all the limitations of armor. In RM terms, you'd still need maneuvering in armor skill to offset the normal armor penalties. That should be a pretty cheap option.
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Offline EltonJ

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Re: Warforged Feats as Background Options (Eberron)
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2022, 05:30:52 PM »
Thanks, jdale.

Here are the feats from Races of Eberron.

ADAMANTINE BODY [WARFORGED]
At the cost of mobility, your warforged body can be crafted with a layer of adamantine that provides formidable protective armor and some damage reduction.

Prerequisites: Warforged, 1st level only.

Benefit: Your armor bonus is increased to +8 and you gain damage reduction 2/adamantine. However, your base land speed is reduced to 20 feet, and you are considered to be wearing heavy armor. You have a +1 maximum Dexterity bonus to AC, a –5 penalty on all skill checks to which armor check penalties apply (Balance, Climb, Escape Artist, Hide, Jump, Move
Silently, Sleight of Hand, Swim, and Tumble), and an arcane spell failure chance of 35%.

Normal: Without this feat, your warforged character has an armor bonus of +2.
Special: Unlike most feats, this feat must be taken at 1st level during character creation. Warforged druids who take this feat cannot cast druid spells or use any of the druid’s supernatural or spell-like class features. Warforged characters with this feat do not gain the benefit of any class feature prohibited to a character wearing heavy armor.

Adamantine in D&D is analogous to Eog, or True Iron (True Steel) in Rolemaster.  Instead of Adamantine plates, one receives Eog plating.  This is usually done for special orders.  If some guy has the money to pay for Eog plating to be installed on his Warforged, then so be it.

COLD IRON TRACERY [WARFORGED]
Cold-forged iron that runs through your body allows you to overcome the supernatural defenses of certain creatures and protecting against some magical attacks.
Prerequisites: Warforged.
Benefit: Your natural weapons and grapple checks made to deal damage are treated as cold iron weapons for the purpose of overcoming damage reduction. You also gain a +1 bonus on Will saves against spells and spell-like abilities.

Cold Iron tracery allows the Warforged to hit creatures who are fey with deadly attacks in D&D.

IRONWOOD BODY [WARFORGED]
Your body is crafted with a layer of hard ironwood that cushions blows.

Prerequisites: Warforged, 1st level only.

Benefit: Your armor bonus increases to +3 and you gain damage reduction 2/slashing. You are considered to be wearing light armor, and have a +4 maximum Dexterity bonus to AC, a –3 penalty on all skill checks to which armor check penalties apply (Balance, Climb, Escape Artist, Hide, Jump, Move Silently, Sleight of Hand, Swim, and Tumble), and an arcane spell failure
chance of 20%.

Normal: Without this feat, your warforged character has an armor bonus of +2.

Special: Unlike most feats, this feat must be taken at 1st level during character creation. A warforged with this feat who then takes Improved Damage Reduction (see page 55 of the EBERRON Campaign Setting) can choose to gain damage reduction 1/adamantine or improve the damage reduction granted by this feat by 2. Unlike the Adamantine Body and Mithral Body feats, warforged druids who take this feat can cast druid spells and use the druid’s supernatural and spell-like abilities.

Iron wood can be like Dyr Wood, although Iron wood is actually an Eberron only substance (Live wood is also an Eberron only substance).  In Rolemaster terms, if Dyr Wood is used, the rules should not change.

SECOND SLAM [WARFORGED]
You have learned to use your form to the utmost and can make two slam attacks.

Prerequisites: Warforged, base attack bonus +6.

Benefit: You can deliver a second slam in any round in which you make a full attack that includes a slam attack. The second slam uses your highest attack bonus with a –5 penalty, and deals your normal slam attack damage.

Special: A fighter can select Second Slam as one of his fighter bonus feats.

Commentary: Second Slam can be translated into a martial art, easy peasy -- using the Martial Arts Companion.  This isn't a tactical feat --- but it can be a unarmed martial art taught to warforged.

SILVER TRACERY [WARFORGED]
Alchemical silver tracery covers your body, allowing you to overcome the supernatural defenses of certain creatures and protecting against some magical attacks.

Prerequisite: Warforged.
Benefit: Your natural weapons and your grapple checks made to deal damage are treated as silvered weapons for the purpose of overcoming damage reduction. (Note: No damage reduction in Rolemaster).  As well, you gain a +1 bonus on Fortitude saves
against spells and spell-like abilities.

Commentary: This would be a special background option, probably one that allows Warforged to make more powerful attacks (Critical Strike)  or just use the magic critical strike table against a Lycanthrope.

SPIKED BODY [WARFORGED]
Your body is overlaid with hundreds of protruding spikes that can deal great damage to foes.

Prerequisite: Warforged.

Benefit: You deal extra piercing damage on a successful grapple attack as if you were wearing armor spikes (1d6 points for a Medium warforged). Though your slam attack deals no extra damage, the damage it deals is treated as both bludgeoning and
piercing damage. The effect of this feat doesn’t stack with equipment or abilities (such as the warforged juggernaut’s armor
spikes; see page 84 of the EBERRON Campaign Setting) that provide similar benefits.

Commentary: This feat would allow a Warforged to deal piercing criticals with his unarmed attacks.

UNARMORED BODY [WARFORGED]
Your body is crafted without its normal layer of armor, trading off physical strength for magical potential.

Prerequisites: Warforged, 1st level only.

Benefit: You lose the normal +2 armor bonus and light fortification common to warforged characters, but you have no inherent chance of arcane spell failure and can wear armor or magic robes and gain their full effects.

Special: Unlike most feats, this feat must be taken at 1st level, during character creation. If you later select any warforged
feat that grants or adjusts an armor bonus or damage reduction, you lose this feat and all its effects.

Commentary: This option would be good for Warforged spellcasters.  Especially of the Essence persuasion.  But they have an AT of 1, compared to the regular Warforged AT of 16.

Offline Druss_the_Legend

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Re: Warforged Feats as Background Options (Eberron)
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2022, 07:21:48 PM »
Thanks, jdale.

Here are the feats from Races of Eberron.

ADAMANTINE BODY [WARFORGED]
At the cost of mobility, your warforged body can be crafted with a layer of adamantine that provides formidable protective armor and some damage reduction.

Prerequisites: Warforged, 1st level only.

Benefit: Your armor bonus is increased to +8 and you gain damage reduction 2/adamantine. However, your base land speed is reduced to 20 feet, and you are considered to be wearing heavy armor. You have a +1 maximum Dexterity bonus to AC, a –5 penalty on all skill checks to which armor check penalties apply (Balance, Climb, Escape Artist, Hide, Jump, Move
Silently, Sleight of Hand, Swim, and Tumble), and an arcane spell failure chance of 35%.

Normal: Without this feat, your warforged character has an armor bonus of +2.
Special: Unlike most feats, this feat must be taken at 1st level during character creation. Warforged druids who take this feat cannot cast druid spells or use any of the druid’s supernatural or spell-like class features. Warforged characters with this feat do not gain the benefit of any class feature prohibited to a character wearing heavy armor.

Adamantine in D&D is analogous to Eog, or True Iron (True Steel) in Rolemaster.  Instead of Adamantine plates, one receives Eog plating.  This is usually done for special orders.  If some guy has the money to pay for Eog plating to be installed on his Warforged, then so be it.

COLD IRON TRACERY [WARFORGED]
Cold-forged iron that runs through your body allows you to overcome the supernatural defenses of certain creatures and protecting against some magical attacks.
Prerequisites: Warforged.
Benefit: Your natural weapons and grapple checks made to deal damage are treated as cold iron weapons for the purpose of overcoming damage reduction. You also gain a +1 bonus on Will saves against spells and spell-like abilities.

Cold Iron tracery allows the Warforged to hit creatures who are fey with deadly attacks in D&D.

IRONWOOD BODY [WARFORGED]
Your body is crafted with a layer of hard ironwood that cushions blows.

Prerequisites: Warforged, 1st level only.

Benefit: Your armor bonus increases to +3 and you gain damage reduction 2/slashing. You are considered to be wearing light armor, and have a +4 maximum Dexterity bonus to AC, a –3 penalty on all skill checks to which armor check penalties apply (Balance, Climb, Escape Artist, Hide, Jump, Move Silently, Sleight of Hand, Swim, and Tumble), and an arcane spell failure
chance of 20%.

Normal: Without this feat, your warforged character has an armor bonus of +2.

Special: Unlike most feats, this feat must be taken at 1st level during character creation. A warforged with this feat who then takes Improved Damage Reduction (see page 55 of the EBERRON Campaign Setting) can choose to gain damage reduction 1/adamantine or improve the damage reduction granted by this feat by 2. Unlike the Adamantine Body and Mithral Body feats, warforged druids who take this feat can cast druid spells and use the druid’s supernatural and spell-like abilities.

Iron wood can be like Dyr Wood, although Iron wood is actually an Eberron only substance (Live wood is also an Eberron only substance).  In Rolemaster terms, if Dyr Wood is used, the rules should not change.

SECOND SLAM [WARFORGED]
You have learned to use your form to the utmost and can make two slam attacks.

Prerequisites: Warforged, base attack bonus +6.

Benefit: You can deliver a second slam in any round in which you make a full attack that includes a slam attack. The second slam uses your highest attack bonus with a –5 penalty, and deals your normal slam attack damage.

Special: A fighter can select Second Slam as one of his fighter bonus feats.

Commentary: Second Slam can be translated into a martial art, easy peasy -- using the Martial Arts Companion.  This isn't a tactical feat --- but it can be a unarmed martial art taught to warforged.

SILVER TRACERY [WARFORGED]
Alchemical silver tracery covers your body, allowing you to overcome the supernatural defenses of certain creatures and protecting against some magical attacks.

Prerequisite: Warforged.
Benefit: Your natural weapons and your grapple checks made to deal damage are treated as silvered weapons for the purpose of overcoming damage reduction. (Note: No damage reduction in Rolemaster).  As well, you gain a +1 bonus on Fortitude saves
against spells and spell-like abilities.

Commentary: This would be a special background option, probably one that allows Warforged to make more powerful attacks (Critical Strike)  or just use the magic critical strike table against a Lycanthrope.

SPIKED BODY [WARFORGED]
Your body is overlaid with hundreds of protruding spikes that can deal great damage to foes.

Prerequisite: Warforged.

Benefit: You deal extra piercing damage on a successful grapple attack as if you were wearing armor spikes (1d6 points for a Medium warforged). Though your slam attack deals no extra damage, the damage it deals is treated as both bludgeoning and
piercing damage. The effect of this feat doesn’t stack with equipment or abilities (such as the warforged juggernaut’s armor
spikes; see page 84 of the EBERRON Campaign Setting) that provide similar benefits.

Commentary: This feat would allow a Warforged to deal piercing criticals with his unarmed attacks.

UNARMORED BODY [WARFORGED]
Your body is crafted without its normal layer of armor, trading off physical strength for magical potential.

Prerequisites: Warforged, 1st level only.

Benefit: You lose the normal +2 armor bonus and light fortification common to warforged characters, but you have no inherent chance of arcane spell failure and can wear armor or magic robes and gain their full effects.

Special: Unlike most feats, this feat must be taken at 1st level, during character creation. If you later select any warforged
feat that grants or adjusts an armor bonus or damage reduction, you lose this feat and all its effects.

Commentary: This option would be good for Warforged spellcasters.  Especially of the Essence persuasion.  But they have an AT of 1, compared to the regular Warforged AT of 16.

pretty cool abilities. has given me an idea for Silvery Tracery Potion in my campaign. The party are up against werewolves and potentially vampire assassins. This will give them some temporary immunity and enhance their weapons/damage.

Offline EltonJ

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Re: Warforged Feats as Background Options (Eberron)
« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2022, 07:36:12 PM »
pretty cool abilities. has given me an idea for Silvery Tracery Potion in my campaign. The party are up against werewolves and potentially vampire assassins. This will give them some temporary immunity and enhance their weapons/damage.

Ah, glad that inspired you.  Hopefully the adventure goes well against the werewolves and vampires.

Offline EltonJ

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Re: Warforged Feats as Background Options (Eberron)
« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2022, 02:19:53 PM »
Can't continue without talking about Special Materials.  So, here are the special materials from D&D and Eberron.  D&D takes some liberties, or is it Rolemaster takes some liberties?  Oh well, both games do.  The information of regular special materials comes from the d20srd.org site (D&D 3.5 reference).  Eberron special materials comes from the Eberron Campaign Setting.

Adamantine: This ultrahard metal adds to the quality of a weapon or suit of armor. Weapons fashioned from adamantine have a natural ability to bypass hardness when sundering weapons or attacking objects, ignoring hardness less than 20. Armor made from adamantine grants its wearer damage reduction of 1/- if it’s light armor, 2/- if it’s medium armor, and 3/- if it’s heavy armor. Adamantine is so costly that weapons and armor made from it are always of masterwork quality; the masterwork cost is included in the prices given below. Thus, adamantine weapons and ammunition have a +1 enhancement bonus on attack rolls, and the armor check penalty of adamantine armor is lessened by 1 compared to ordinary armor of its type. Items without metal parts cannot be made from adamantine. An arrow could be made of adamantine, but a quarterstaff could not.

Only weapons, armor, and shields normally made of metal can be fashioned from adamantine. Weapons, armor and shields normally made of steel that are made of adamantine have one-third more hit points than normal. Adamantine has 40 hit points per inch of thickness and hardness 20.

Adamantine is D&D's Eog.  Eog is as hard as adamantine, but can be mined.

Darkwood: This rare magic wood is as hard as normal wood but very light. Any wooden or mostly wooden item (such as a bow, an arrow, or a spear) made from darkwood is considered a masterwork item and weighs only half as much as a normal wooden item of that type. Items not normally made of wood or only partially of wood (such as a battleaxe or a mace) either cannot be made from darkwood or do not gain any special benefit from being made of darkwood. The armor check penalty of a darkwood shield is lessened by 2 compared to an ordinary shield of its type. To determine the price of a darkwood item, use the original weight but add 10 gp per pound to the price of a masterwork version of that item.

Darkwood has 10 hit points per inch of thickness and hardness 5.

Darkwood from D&D has no Rolemaster equivalent.

Dragonhide: Armorsmiths can work with the hides of dragons to produce armor or shields of masterwork quality. One dragon produces enough hide for a single suit of masterwork hide armor for a creature one size category smaller than the dragon. By selecting only choice scales and bits of hide, an armorsmith can produce one suit of masterwork banded mail for a creature two sizes smaller, one suit of masterwork half-plate for a creature three sizes smaller, or one masterwork breastplate or suit of full plate for a creature four sizes smaller. In each case, enough hide is available to produce a small or large masterwork shield in addition to the armor, provided that the dragon is Large or larger.

Because dragonhide armor isn’t made of metal, druids can wear it without penalty.

Dragonhide armor costs double what masterwork armor of that type ordinarily costs, but it takes no longer to make than ordinary armor of that type.

Dragonhide has 10 hit points per inch of thickness and hardness 10.

Dragonhide has a Rolemaster equivalency.

Iron, Cold: This iron, mined deep underground, known for its effectiveness against fey creatures, is forged at a lower temperature to preserve its delicate properties. Weapons made of cold iron cost twice as much to make as their normal counterparts. Also, any magical enhancements cost an additional 2,000 gp.

Items without metal parts cannot be made from cold iron. An arrow could be made of cold iron, but a quarterstaff could not.

A double weapon that has only half of it made of cold iron increases its cost by 50%.

Cold iron has 30 hit points per inch of thickness and hardness 10.

Cold iron isn't like Eog.  There's no equivalent in Rolemaster.

Mithral: Mithral is a very rare silvery, glistening metal that is lighter than iron but just as hard. When worked like steel, it becomes a wonderful material from which to create armor and is occasionally used for other items as well. Most mithral armors are one category lighter than normal for purposes of movement and other limitations. Heavy armors are treated as medium, and medium armors are treated as light, but light armors are still treated as light. Spell failure chances for armors and shields made from mithral are decreased by 10%, maximum Dexterity bonus is increased by 2, and armor check penalties are lessened by 3 (to a minimum of 0).

An item made from mithral weighs half as much as the same item made from other metals. In the case of weapons, this lighter weight does not change a weapon’s size category or the ease with which it can be wielded (whether it is light, one-handed, or two-handed). Items not primarily of metal are not meaningfully affected by being partially made of mithral. (A longsword can be a mithral weapon, while a scythe cannot be.)

Weapons or armors fashioned from mithral are always masterwork items as well; the masterwork cost is included in the prices given below.

Mithral has 30 hit points per inch of thickness and hardness 15.

Mithral in D&D is Mithril in Rolemaster.  So there's a direct correlation (except for the fact that Wizards calls Mithril "Mithral."  Probably to avoid a copyright lawsuit.)

Silver, Alchemical: A complex process involving metallurgy and alchemy can bond silver to a weapon made of steel so that it bypasses the damage reduction of creatures such as lycanthropes.

On a successful attack with a silvered weapon, the wielder takes a -1 penalty on the damage roll (with the usual minimum of 1 point of damage). The alchemical silvering process can’t be applied to nonmetal items, and it doesn’t work on rare metals such as adamantine, cold iron, and mithral.

Alchemical silver has 10 hit points per inch of thickness and hardness 8.

This is the same as silvered weapons in Rolemaster.  Thoughts?

Offline jdale

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Re: Warforged Feats as Background Options (Eberron)
« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2022, 04:09:31 PM »
>Darkwood from D&D has no Rolemaster equivalent.

Many of the higher-end wooden items in RMFRP Treasure Law are made of Dyr Wood, which is not explained in the book as far as I can see. I don't know where that comes from, but I see in a number of Scandinavian languages "dyr" has a meaning of "dear" in the sense of precious or expensive. So I guess an expensive wood that comes from the north.

There's also Ironwood which is just a very hard wood, and some other normal woods.

RMU Treasure Law doesn't have Dyr but does have Dask (increases the number of charges for wands etc), Vaal (+20 due to density and hardness), and Springwood (+20 for bows). If you apply that bonus to the maneuver penalties instead of DB (which is always an option), Vaal lines up with Darkwood ok (except maybe better).

Cold Iron exists only because they wanted fae vulnerable to it, it doesn't serve any other purpose and you could equally well give it an arbitrary name since it isn't exactly what "cold iron" was in the old stories. But the real thing wouldn't make much sense in a setting where fighting against fae is an ordinary sort of thing, since it is too easy.

RM also has laen which could be interesting for any foe resistant to metal weapons.
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Offline EltonJ

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Re: Warforged Feats as Background Options (Eberron)
« Reply #7 on: August 05, 2022, 04:16:15 PM »
>Darkwood from D&D has no Rolemaster equivalent.

Many of the higher-end wooden items in RMFRP Treasure Law are made of Dyr Wood, which is not explained in the book as far as I can see. I don't know where that comes from, but I see in a number of Scandinavian languages "dyr" has a meaning of "dear" in the sense of precious or expensive. So I guess an expensive wood that comes from the north.

There's also Ironwood which is just a very hard wood, and some other normal woods.

RMU Treasure Law doesn't have Dyr but does have Dask (increases the number of charges for wands etc), Vaal (+20 due to density and hardness), and Springwood (+20 for bows). If you apply that bonus to the maneuver penalties instead of DB (which is always an option), Vaal lines up with Darkwood ok (except maybe better).

Cold Iron exists only because they wanted fae vulnerable to it, it doesn't serve any other purpose and you could equally well give it an arbitrary name since it isn't exactly what "cold iron" was in the old stories. But the real thing wouldn't make much sense in a setting where fighting against fae is an ordinary sort of thing, since it is too easy.

RM also has laen which could be interesting for any foe resistant to metal weapons.

Laen is like obsidian, but harder and can only be worked under frigid conditions, correct?

Offline EltonJ

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Re: Warforged Feats as Background Options (Eberron)
« Reply #8 on: August 05, 2022, 05:16:28 PM »
Better continue with Eberron specific special materials.

Bronzewood: This exceptionally hard wood, native to Aerenal, is useful in the manufacture of armor and weapons. Unlike most woods, bronzewood can be used instead of metal to fashion heavy armor and weapons—it is somewhat shapeable during manufacturing, and it keeps a sharp edge. Although dense and weighty compared to other woods, it is still lighter than steel: Items weigh 10% less when made from bronzewood rather than metal. Breastplate, banded mail, splint mail, half plate, and full plate can be made from bronzewood.

Armor made of bronzewood is somewhat less obtrusive than similar armor made of metal. The armor check penalty from bronzewood armor and shields does not affect Hide checks made in woodland environments. Although bronzewood can replace metal in most weapons, chain weapons such as the spiked chain cannot be made from it. Weapons made from bronzewood have no special characteristics apart from their lighter weight. Bronzewood has hardness 10 and 20 hit points per inch of thickness.

Byeshk: Mined in the Byeshk and Graywall Mountains bordering Droaam, this rare metal is prized by smiths for use in jewelry and weapons. It has a lustrous purple sheen and is hard and dense. A bludgeoning weapon whose head is made of byeshk has a
+1 enhancement bonus on damage rolls. (This bonus does not stack with an enhancement bonus provided by magic.)

In addition, byeshk weapons of any type are able to overcome the damage reduction of daelkyr, which are resistant to all other weapons. The market price modifier of a byeshk weapon is +1,500 gp. Byeshk is difficult to work into armor, and it offers no significant advantage over iron armor. Byeshk has hardness 17 and 35 hit points per inch of thickness. An item made of byeshk weighs 50% more than the same item made of iron. Byeshk is difficult to work, increasing the DC of Craft checks to
create or repair an item made from it (see page 46).

Densewood: One of the most important products of the forests of Aerenal, densewood is a strong, hard, heavy wood similar to iron in its properties. It has hardness 8 (comparable to stone) and 20 hit points per inch of thickness. The DC for breaking a densewood item with a Strength check increases by 5 compared to a normal wooden item. A densewood item weighs twice as much as the same item made from normal wood, and costs twice as much (before adding any cost for a masterwork component or an enhancement bonus). Items without wooden parts, including armor and bladed weapons, cannot be made from densewood.

Dragonshard: Dragonshards are hard, translucent stones similar to precious gemstones, appearing in three varieties: golden-veined Siberys shards, Khyber shards filled with veins of midnight blue to oily black, and crimson-swirled Eberron shards. Dragonshards are rarely found large enough to be crafted into items of any significant size. Most often, a small dragonshard is formed into a piece of jewelry to serve as a personal focus to enhance the power of a dragonmarked character. A larger dragonshard, up to the size of a fist, can be crafted into a larger focus item.

Unattuned dragonshards have hardness 10. The process of attunement softens a stone slightly, reducing its hardness to 8. A dragonshard has 20 hit points per inch of thickness. More details concerning dragonshards appear on page 259.

Flametouched Iron: Mined only in Thrane, flametouched iron is rare and considered sacred by the Church of the Silver Flame. When mined, this iron variety has a speckled dark red color, resembling rust, but when it is refined, it takes on a shimmering, silvery hue. Adherents of the Church of the Silver Flame believe that flametouched iron carries the particular blessing of their deity, and they use it to make holy symbols, weapons, and armor.

Flametouched iron has the same weight and other physical characteristics as iron (hardness 10, 30 hit points per inch of thickness). It possesses magical qualities, however, that manifest in different ways depending on the item it is crafted into. A flametouched iron weapon is treated as a good-aligned weapon for the purpose of overcoming damage reduction. Flametouched iron armor grants the wearer a +1 resistance bonus on saving throws against the spells, spell-like abilities, and supernatural abilities of evil outsiders. A flametouched iron holy symbol allows a character who can turn undead or censure fiends to do so
as if his class level were one higher than it actually is. A flametouched iron weapon or suit of armor has a market price modifier of +1,000 gp. A flametouched iron holy symbol costs 750 gp. Items without metal parts cannot be made from flametouched iron.

Livewood: Another of the unusual woods of Aerenal, livewood is a green-colored hardwood with a highly magical nature. When livewood trees are felled, they do not die, though they stop all growth. Livewood can be worked like normal hardwood, while it remains completely alive. In most respects, livewood is just like normal wood. A few spells affect livewood in different ways from normal wood, however. Plant growth causes worked livewood to sprout small branches and leaves, though diminish plants has no effect. Speak with plants allows a character to communicate with a livewood object, though such an object has no more awareness of its surroundings than most normal plants.

Blight deals damage to a livewood object as if the object were a plant creature (1d6 points of damage per level; the wood’s hardness does not apply). A character can use tree stride to move from one livewood object to another, or from a livewood tree to a livewood object (and vice versa), as long as the livewood object is large enough. Animate plants can animate a livewood object. Dryads o ccasionally make their homes in livewood trees instead of oak trees. Such a dryad looks no more kindly upon the felling of her tree than other dryads do, but the felling of her livewood tree does not kill her—nor does it end her dependence on the tree. As a result, dryads can be found within livewood objects, including buildings, furniture, and ships.

Livewood has hardness 6 and 10 hit points per inch of thickness. The cost of a livewood item is half again as much (+50%) as a normal wooden item. Items without wooden parts, including armor and bladed weapons, can not be made from livewood.

Riedran Crysteel: The Inspired lords of Riedra supervise the mining of a crystalline substance that can be alloyed with iron to form Riedran crysteel. Crysteel makes excellent weapons, and the crystalline component makes them resonate with psionic (mentalist) power. When wielded by a character who has at least 1 power point, a crysteel weapon gains a +1 enhancement bonus on damage rolls.

Riedran crysteel has hardness 10 and 20 hit points per inch of thickness. Items made of crysteel are susceptible to the shatter spell, but gain a +4 bonus on their saving throws to resist it because the crystal is alloyed with iron. The market price modifier for a crysteel weapon is +1,500 gp. Items without metal parts cannot be made from Riedran crysteel.

Soarwood: Rare even in the abundant forests of Aerenal, soarwood possesses a magical buoyancy. Ships made from soarwood skim effortlessly over the surface of the water. Soarwood is a necessary component of the airships and elemental galleons manufactured by House Orien Lyrandar and House Cannith.

The speed of a boat or ship made from soarwood is double that of an equivalent boat made from ordinary wood, and the cost is four times normal. Soarwood has the same physical characteristics as normal wood (hardness 5, 10 hit points per inch of thickness), but weighs only 75% as much.

Targath: Targath is a soft metal mined on the northern coast of Argonnessen. Often fashioned into periapts of health, targath naturally possesses some of the qualities of those magic items: Even a small amount of targath worn or carried on the body grants a character a +2 resistance bonus on Fortitude saves against disease. Targath is, for reasons that are not clear, anathema to the deathless of Aerenal: They shrink from its touch, and a weapon fashioned from targath can overcome their damage reduction.

Perhaps fortunately for the Undying Court, weapons made of targath are inferior to steel weapons, imposing a –1 penalty on attack rolls and damage rolls. Targath has hardness 9 and 20 hit points per inch of thickness.