Author Topic: So which magic(s) is too unbalanced/powerful (RMSS).  (Read 1359 times)

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Offline Ruffie

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Re: So which magic(s) is too unbalanced/powerful (RMSS).
« Reply #20 on: September 21, 2020, 04:33:14 AM »
Indeed, I was mistaken. Still, the invisibility spell is very powerful.

Offline Ecthelion

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Re: So which magic(s) is too unbalanced/powerful (RMSS).
« Reply #21 on: September 21, 2020, 07:45:31 AM »
Once our mage reached higher levels he would combine: "Invisibility, fly" and once safe above the battlefield it would start raining fireballs which (if I remember correctly) don't break invisibility.
That fireballs, like all other offensive spells, break invisibility was already mentioned. In addition, similar to combat from horseback where mounted combat skill needs to be developed and is limiting the OB, we require Aerial Combat to be developed for combat while flying. That does severely limit the spell combat abilities while flying. In our game combat spells while flying are therefore practically non-existent.

Offline MisterK

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Re: So which magic(s) is too unbalanced/powerful (RMSS).
« Reply #22 on: September 25, 2020, 12:29:54 PM »
Once our mage reached higher levels he would combine: "Invisibility, fly" and once safe above the battlefield it would start raining fireballs which (if I remember correctly) don't break invisibility.
All offensive actions break invisibility.
I've had the pleasure to GM a lvl 20 RM campaign (with custom magical energy rules) where one caster had flight and invisibility spells and systematically cast them on the whole party (extended flight, just to be sure). Another one was an Armsmaster with the mental link tactical spell. And they used it. Every time they could. And I did not find it broken, because I knew about it, so I knew what could be a challenge and what could not. Flight and invisibility do not protect against illusions (but attacking illusions do break invisibility). They are active spells, so are detected by basically any magic detection capability. The characters were still physical, so were vulnerable to a number of area effects. Dispelling suddenly became a major risk. And so on. Basically, it gave the characters a very powerful "first strike" capability that they could not use safely all the time. which was exactly what I was looking for, even though I had not foreseen it :)
I knew most fights would either start with them ambushing the opposition, or with them being surprised by a sudden attack they had not anticipated. It put more emphasis on information gathering and preparation, which was a nice side benefit.

In the same campaign, one of the players was playing an Enchanter (Mentalism Co, hybrid). The player very quickly discovered how unbalanced the spells could be (level 20 characters, remember), and it could have been OP if he had not applied self-restraint (the character had a good background reason to be a bit reluctant to use invasive mental magic).