Author Topic: Query: primary sources  (Read 2866 times)

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Offline PhillipAEllis

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Query: primary sources
« on: November 04, 2012, 09:03:49 PM »
Regarding primary sources, such as the poets, historians, etcetera, how helpful would it be if we compiled an annotated bibliography, with details on period covered, reliability, biases, and so forth? Suetonius, for example, is a must for the core campaign, and even Macrobius' Attic Nights preserves useful material.

What say you?
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Offline markc

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Re: Query: primary sources
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2012, 08:07:55 AM »
  I would say anything that can give a player good info to play a PC in would be great. I could also see it provide some good info for GM's.
  IMHO biases of various Provence's, Provence vs Provence biases, would be great info.


 Why are towns laid out like the are? ie distance from one another and location.


 Instead of just providing reading ideas if you could give a good gist of the material or provide why it is so important. That way people who do not have the time can use the material and later (in life generally) pick up the material by the author.


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Offline PhillipAEllis

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Re: Query: primary sources
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2012, 02:54:57 PM »
That's a good idea, regarding biases. The sort of things that would make good annotations in an annotated bibliography. Would you like an idea point? :)

Regarding the central question, there is a hint of that, from memory in Thucydies, in the start to book I of his history where he discusses the early history of the Greek states. The basic idea for the walled polis was, to paraphrase, as a defense against raiders. He talks elsewhere about the long walls of Athens, making a similar implication.
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